Creativation

Creativity is thinking up new things.

I read an article recently which identified creativity as the No. 1 “leadership competency” of the future. Innovation was also in the top five. It went on to discuss the lack of creativity and innovation in US schools. As I read, I couldn’t help but think about what creativity and innovation would look like in my classroom next year.

To me, creativity and innovation go hand in hand. I perceive creativity as the prime source for innovation. I see it as a process, a way of generating ideas and expressions, which can amplify knowledge and lead to new ways of thinking and problem solving. Bringing those ideas to fruition is innovation. It can be an original production, something altered, something better and more useful. There is no one right way or answer. How can I incorporate creativity and innovation into my classroom? What would this look like?

When I think of creativity and innovation as a session in my classroom, I think of it as something similar to my Genius Hour. It’s a time devoted to student curiosity and interest; a time for research, collaboration and exploration. Where every student can feel empowered to explore their passions. Creativation (yes, this is what I will call it) is the adjunction of creativity and innovation. Creativation is a time for divergent and convergent thinking; a time to generate many unique ideas, and to combining those ideas into the best result.

All around us are national and international problems, real world problems of importance %22Creativity and Innovation are about finding unexpected solutions to obvious problems%22-2that desperately need creative solutions. Our world is running out of natural resources each day, many still do not have safe drinking water, and our oceans are heavily polluted. Creativation will give students an opportunity to generate solutions to such issues.  Students will be able to understand the importance of contributing original ideas and being receptive to the ideas of others. They will see creativity and innovation as a necessity. These two necessities of human ingenuity should be unchallenged.

The more I think about creativation, the more I wonder; is it learnable?  Can anyone really learn how to be creative and innovative? I believe so. When I think about it, a vertically challenged basketball player comes to mind. Being tall assists a pro basketball player immensely, but even short players (Spud Webb and Nate Robinson…I know…I’m dating myself) have achieved success through hard work and practice. In the same way, there are certain individuals naturally prone to being creative and innovative thinkers. Creativity and innovation requires a constant shifting of ideas. It requires a blending of new information with old, new ideas with forgotten ideas; a constant back and forth, pendulum swing, the blending divergent and convergent thinking. I feel those who practice creative activities learn to prime their brains’ to think in this way.

So what does this mean for America’s standards-obsessed schools? Creativity and innovation are very much sought after in American schools, but its clearly been misunderstood and certainly not supported. Some argue that creativity and innovation should only happen in an art room, shop class or a kindergarten wing. Others believe we can’t teach creativity and innovation because learners already have too much to learn. Most school curricula does not, as of yet, encourage creativity and innovation, mainly because they are not clear how creativity should be defined and how it should be treated in learning and assessment. A school district’s curricula is often overloaded with content and this content reduces the possibility of creative and innovative learning approaches in practice.

Schools play a key role in fostering and developing students’ creative and innovative capacities for further learning. Creativity needs to be viewed as a cross-curricular skill, a  skill which students should be encouraged to develop. Creativity and innovation isn’t about freedom from concrete facts. Rather, it’s fact-finding, it’s rooted in deep thoughtful research.  These are vital stages in the creative, innovative and learning processes. Creativity and innovation have strong links with knowledge and learning. Creative learning requires innovative teaching. This type of teaching calls for educators to become reflective practitioners. Teachers need to be able to distinguish how a teaching method or activity can stifle or trigger creativity and innovation in their students.

One of the enemies of creativity and innovation, especially in relation to our own development is

So, how do we do this? Currently, teachers lack support in bringing forth creativity and innovation into their classrooms. Many focus on convergence and discipline instead of divergence because it’s easier to handle. Teachers play a major role in constructing creative environments. Our teachers need training, support, and encouragement from administration, colleagues, parents, students, and the community. Many educators agree that current curriculum standards can still be met, if taught in a different way. The time has come to change our educational culture to one that values creativity and innovation and sees it as an asset in the classroom. What will you do differently to promote creativation in your classroom?

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Creativation

  1. You are spot on when you discuss the need we have to bring creativation to our teachers in a way that they can see that it’s not “one more thing” but a way of thinking and doing that empowers them to make decisions about instruction that eventually impacts students in a powerful way.

    I totally agree with the argument for divergent thinking but wonder about teachers feeling like they have to give up “control” in some way that will negatively effect the classroom and thus instruction and learning. Many know this isn’t true and would greatly benefit from support, encouragement and modeling in their own buildings.

    Students have the answers to their questions and passions- we just need to give them permission, tools and time to pursue them for everyone’s benefit- most importantly their own!

    Thanks for the post- you’ve got me thinking how to talk to me teachers….

    Like

  2. Hi Spiri.
    What a great post, which I found as a result of George’s post. I absolutely agree with you & your son. I am writing a book about student digital leadership and would love to use your son’s quote. May I do this and cite this blogpost? Please let me know via email. Thanks!

    Like

  3. Pingback: Grow Their Brain | fromthecyberside

  4. Pingback: Small Packages Lead to Great Innovation | fromthecyberside

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