Undetected and Undernourished

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visualspatial

Some of you have asked why I have been absent from Twitter chats, reading & responding to favorite blogs and why I’m not as visible on other social media outlets. It has been a difficult school year for my children. After working a full day, I come home to assist my children with their learning. Sometimes I’m reteaching material and other times I’m assisting them with numerous worksheet packets, test prep sheets, and endless amount of homework. That being said, I thought I would give you a glimpse of what our school year has been like. Please no negative comments. Instead, words of encouragement and support for Sophie would be much appreciated. Thank you ūüôā

I hear sobbing from her bedroom again. I hesitate to knock on the door. I know what she is crying about. A lump forms in my throat. My eyes well up. My heart is heavy. I sigh. I take a moment before I knock and ask to enter her room.

14368655_10211563700554859_2999918388971433763_nMy daughter, Sophia (#Sophiegirl) is my heart. She is my mini me. She has smiled and laughed every day of her life. She is our comedienne, our creative artist, and our resident athlete. It’s beyond difficult to see her so upset.

After numerous days and hours studying, memorizing rules and formulas for a math test, Sophie scored a 50%.

Sophie is a hands-on, creative, and visual learner. She is a thinker, “a doer”; she sees things differently. Every year we discuss her learning style with her teachers. We discuss how Sophie needs to make connections with what she is learning; her assignments need to be meaningful. Sophie doesn’t learn like other students in her 6th grade classroom; she does not learn in a linear way. She learns through creating, manipulating and questioning. She is passionate and curious about many things, and needs to express it. She likes a challenge. She likes to figure things out on her own. She is not accustomed to memorizing lengthy test prep sheets. In our home, my children know that learning is not memorizing facts. In our home, learning is anything but memorizing.

Once again, she had 3 days to study and to complete problems from a xeroxed math packet. Her anxiety and nerves were on HIGH alert. She put forth the effort and did not receive the success she was hoping for. Once again, we will reach out to her teacher, asking for assistance.

As I entered her room, I saw her on her iPad. Her eyes red, her cheeks tear stained. Her nose runny. She moved over and invited me onto her bed.

“You okay?” I asked.

She stared intensely at the screen, her eyes becoming moist. She bit her bottom lip (just like her mama) and nodded.

“Did you see my test?”, Sophie asked. “I told you, I’m just not good at math.”

“What are you working on?” I asked.

“I’m re-designing my house. I thought I would add more organized closet space as well as a more detailed laundry room with shelves and a counter. I’m just having a hard time with the measurement, but I think I figured it out.” she said.

As she showed me her creation on a home design app. She discussed how she needed to increase the dimensions of the rooms, which also increased the area of her house. The additional square footage would also mean an upgrade in the heating and cooling system. In the laundry room, she had chosen a plywood based counter but realized it would not be strong enough for the weight of a slab of marble. So, she made the decision to cut into her budget once again, to purchase a solid wood counter. She continued on about her designs, her budget, her measurements, the functionality and proportions of the space.

 


I sat there a bit dumbfounded. She has such an understanding of design, working within a budget, measuring and proportions. So many math concepts. She learned this all on her own. Why are we still drilling and killing our learners in math? Why hasn’t the xeroxed math packet died? Will her teacher ever realize her potential?

Sophie is a visual spatial learner. These learners think in pictures rather than in words and learn differently than auditory and sequential learners. They learn all-at-once, visually and creatively. When the “a-ha” moment happens, the learning is permanent. Visual spatial learners do not learn from repetition, or the dreaded “drill and skill” methods that we see in classrooms. They need to see the big picture first before they learn about the details. They are also non-linear, and do not learn in a step-by-step manner. The fact is, most teachers today, teach in their own learning style. As adults, this tends to mostly be an auditory, and sequential modality.

Success in today’s schools still depends upon a learner memorizing facts, handing in assignments, following directions and having fast recall. These auditory sequential skills are actually limiting the potential of all students to be successful, and gain employment in today‚Äôs world.

Great teachers appreciate that no two students are alike and great teachers recognize differences among students due to readiness, interests, and learning styles. Many teachers try very hard to accommodate the various learning styles of their students, but this can be an overwhelming task, as some of the learning styles inventories and models are quite complicated. We live in an age where multi-modal approaches to teaching and learning are absolutely necessary for our learners’ success. Students need opportunities to engage in mastering concepts and skills by creating, exploring and working with hands on materials and integrated technology.

I know someday, Sophie will be a phenomenal architect and she will meet a teacher who will appreciate her way of thinking. Some day, her gifts will be acknowledged and celebrated. And someday, learning math and studying for a math test will not mean completing problems from a math packet.

Hang in there #Sophiegirl, we’re working on it.

 

 

 

 

Leaping Into PBL Waters

 

pbl

I always purchase a few Christmas presents for myself. Usually, these gifts turn out to be books floating around on my to read list. So, this Christmas, I decided to treat myself to a new Hack Learning Series book.

Project based learning has a long history in American education, dating back to John Dewey and other early advocates of learning by doing.¬†The project approach has gotten a second wind over the past few decades, as a key strategy to engage diverse learners in rigorous learning. I remember the first time I implemented PBL in my classroom. Our real world problem for my third graders was one that a student discussed in her blog and led to a classroom discussion. She was scared to ride a roller coaster over the summer. Her friends continued to tease her about it. She was hoping to learn more about roller coasters to ease her fear. Her question in her blog was simple, “How can a roller coaster car even stay on track?”.

 

 

With this in mind, I thought it would be fun to have my learners design and build their own roller coaster during our force & motion unit for science. Although I had never designed a PBL unit, I had done quite a bit of research to assist with my planning and understanding of implementation. My students collaborated together, discussed ideas, and researched how best to design their roller coaster. We viewed Disney Imagineering videos, interviewed an engineer from Hershey Park and were so fortunate to have a parent (and engineer) come and assist with our designs. Their hands on exploration of potential and kinetic energy, as well as friction, carried over into other areas. My learners were writing about their trials and errors, reading about clothoid loops and even tied-in math when comparing times of their car launch with each design. Did it go smoothly? No, not even close. Was it a learning experience for both learners and teacher? Yes. Did it stop me from implementing PBL into my classroom again? No way. As I look back, I wish I had a step by step outline to assist. I wish, at the time, I had the book Hacking Project Based Learning.

 

 

In the book, Hacking Project Based Learning, Ross Cooper and Erin Murphy discuss how to over come challenges that PBL may possibly pose for teachers and students. One of the scariest things about implementing a project based learning approach with your learners is letting go; letting students take ownership of their learning. Even the most creative teachers, who have taken the leap into the PBL waters, continue to find it difficult to let go of their role as teacher, despite having the best intentions for their learners. One reason a teacher may be reluctant to let go of the reins, is the fear of losing control, or that the class may go off in some random direction.

Cooper and Murphy discuss the importance of how to create a vision for a project, and setting the stage for an authentic learning experience. PBL provides an opportunity to help our learners make authentic real world connections. Each morning my learners entered our room, enthusiastic and ready to discuss their ideas. They were eager to share valuable insight with their classmates, and get right to work.

Instruction and learning is different in problem based settings than traditional instruction. Problem based learning provides challenges for evaluation and assessment. Hacking PBL provides a plethora of ideas such as a Progress Assessment Tool and how to evaluate group and individual work. Each year my learners reflect on their¬†PBL project and each year my students’ reflection provides a new piece to the puzzle on how to make the¬†unit better.

“If we want the emphasis to be on the learning and not the grading, we ultimately want to give our students a tool that helps them to self and peer assess throughout the PBL process.”

~Hacking PBL

I have been a huge proponent of Project Based Learning both in my traditional brick and mortar classroom, and the¬†modern cyber classroom, I teach in now. Although they look very different in each environment, my PBL units continue to emphasize solving highly complex, real world problems. PBL requires that students have both fundamental skills (reading, writing, and math) and 21st century skills (teamwork, problem solving, and research). With this combination of skills, students become directors and managers of their learning process. The old school model of learning facts, and then reciting them out of context is no longer sufficient to prepare learners to perform¬†in today’s world. If you’re thinking of implementing PBL into your classroom, do it! Project Based Learning provides a rich learning experience, one that your learners will eagerly devour. Oh, and do yourself a favor, read Hacking Project Based Learning.¬†It¬†is a critical, and necessary component to a successful PBL launch.